Cook County Court Service Deputies

The Labor Council provides full union representation: negotiating and enforcing contracts, improving salaries, working conditions, and benefits for law enforcement professionals throughout Illinois. Our members are protected 24 hours a day by a staff of full-time, in-house attorneys and field representatives who have a proven track record of winning.

24 Hour Critical Incident Hotline: 877-IFOP-911

By Tamara Cummings, General Counsel - Wednesday, July 19, 2017

 

CHICAGO – The proposed layoffs of Cook County Court Service Deputies will put public safety at risk, and the Illinois Fraternal Order of Police Labor Council (ILFOP) contends the budget cuts are unnecessary because job levels in this critically understaffed area have already been slashed 11 percent over the last three years. Moreover, even though the budget shortfall is county wide, the bulk of the cuts so far have been to public safety personnel such as sheriff's police, court service deputies, corrections personnel, states attorneys and public defenders.CHICAGO – The proposed layoffs of Cook County Court Service Deputies will put public safety at risk, and the Illinois Fraternal Order of Police Labor Council (ILFOP) contends the budget cuts are unnecessary because job levels in this critically understaffed area have already been slashed 11 percent over the last three years. Moreover, even though the budget shortfall is county wide, the bulk of the cuts so far have been to public safety personnel such as sheriff's police, court service deputies, corrections personnel, states attorneys and public defenders.

"The safety of judges, jurors, witnesses and victims who appear in court on a daily basis should not be used as a bargaining chip in a local government power struggle," said ILFOP Assistant Director Shawn Roselieb. "More and more offenders are being hauled into court as we work to cleanse our streets of violence, and this is the wrong time to reduce an already understaffed court security system."
The ILFOP represents Court Service Deputies and other employees of the Cook County Sheriff's Department. Court Service Deputies provide security in the courtrooms, public areas and offices of the county's judicial centers. They also include specialty units such as civil process that serve orders of protection, warrants, levies and eviction notices; the K9 unit; and the Sheriff's Work Alternative Program (SWAP). The ILFOP is responding to Cook County Board President Toni Preckwinkle's assertion that a number of Court Service Deputies must be laid off to make up for the loss of revenue from the county-wide soda tax. The tax, which helps fund certain Cook County services, has been blocked by a temporary restraining order.   

The number of Cook County Court Service Deputies has dropped from 1,110 in October 2014 to 989 in July 2017. There have been no court service training academy classes since 2006, which reduces the number of eligible candidates during the increasingly rare occasions when positions are filled. These reduced numbers mean deputies must often work multiple courtrooms at once, instead of having a minimum of one per courtroom.     

"Threatening the safety of taxpayers and the lives of hard-working employees is not a good budget negotiation strategy," Roselieb said. "It's time to stop the one-upmanship and protect law-abiding Cook County citizens from potential tragedies or expensive litigation."   
The Fraternal Order of Police Labor Council is a law enforcement union representing more than 11,600 professionals in more than 514 bargaining units who work in the criminal justice system. The Labor Council negotiates and enforces contracts and  improves salaries, working conditions, and benefits for law enforcement professionals throughout Illinois. Its members include police officers who work for municipalities, universities, and elected Constitutional officials; county sheriff’s deputies, correctional and court security officers; probation officers; 911 telecommunicators; law enforcement records personnel; and some related support staff.



By Dan Mahoney, Attorney - Friday, July 14, 2017

 

This afternoon, the Union had a conversation with the Sheriff’s Office regarding county-wide layoffs. Once again, it should be stressed that no layoff notices have gone out to Court Service Deputies. The Union is committed to keeping the current workforce intact.

After receiving a notification from the County Board President regarding layoffs, the Sheriff sent proposals to the County with alternatives to laying off personnel. The Sheriff has met with the County, and will continue to meet with the County to try to prevent layoffs.

The Sheriff’s Office has assured the Union that if layoffs are unavoidable they will work with the Union to minimize the impact, with an emphasis on the health and safety of the Court Service Deputies.



By Dan Mahoney, Attorney - Friday, July 07, 2017

 

While the Union is aware of the letter that was sent by the Sheriff, as well as the letter the County Board President sent to the Sheriff, it is important to note that neither the County nor the Sheriff have notified the Union of any proposed layoff. 

Our Collective Bargaining Agreement requires the Joint Employer to notify the Union of any proposed layoff. If that does happen, the Union will notify you immediately.

As you are aware, we have begun negotiations with the County and the Sheriff,  We will continue to bargain in good faith, while monitoring the current situation.  The next scheduled negotiation date is Monday, July 10th.  At that time, the interim Chief Financial Officer will present the sate of the County's finances to your Bargaining Team.

Both the Union and your individual Stewards will update you as information becomes available.



By Dan Mahoney, Attorney - Monday, June 12, 2017

 



By IL FOP Labor Council, Staff - Tuesday, June 06, 2017

 

 

Thursday, July 6, 2017- 9am-4:30pm

LOCATION: Rock Island Police Department

1212 5th Ave

Rock Island, IL 61201

Class size is limited to the first 30 participants.  Please register with Chris Flynn at (217) 698-9433 or email: cflynn@fop.org Lunch will be provided.

9- 10:30am (Dave Nixon and Jerry Lieb) Fraternal vs Labor (New Steward Training)

Members will learn the distinction between IL FOP State Lodge vs IL FOP Labor Council and the importance of each.  Instruction will cover the following topics: running meetings, developing by-laws, grievance preparation, and duties for representing your membership.  

10:30-10:45am Break 

10:45- 11:15am (Michael Baker and Dean Hill) Gun Owner Liability Insurance

Shield-U has designed an insurance policy and made it available to our members at a reduced rate.  The policy is specifically designed for FOP members and IROCC (Illinois Retired Officer Concealed Carry) permit holders and their families.  Shield-U is an Illinois business, and they have received authorization from the Illinois Department of Insurance to offer this product. To learn more check it out at shielduins.com 

11:15am-12:15pm Lunch provided on-site

12:15- 2:00pm (Mike Powell and Gary Bailey) Collective Bargaining

Attendees will receive instruction on preparation for negotiations/ reaching tentative agreement or impasse/mediation and arbitration.

 2:00- 2:15pm Break

 2:15-4:30pm (Dan Bailey and Tamara Cummings) Handling a Critical Incident

Members will learn their role in handling a critical incident, and what they should do to protect the rights of their coworkers. IL FOP LC Critical Incident Hotline 1-(877) IFOP-911

 Next training session scheduled: Thursday, September 14, 2017 at Jacksonville Police Department.



By Shawn Roselieb, Assistant Executive Director - Monday, May 22, 2017

 

The Spring Legislative Session is winding down and your future is in jeopardy! 
 
Your Pension is the most important asset you have, protect it! Don't let the trickle down effect take place!  Not currently affected?  Guess again!  Once this initiative succeeds - YOU will be next... 
 
In recent years, the Illinois Supreme Court has twice found legislation reducing the pension benefits of active and retired public employees to be unconstitutional. So why does Governor Rauner keep pushing to cut public employee pensions-and why are some legislators going along with him?
 
It's important to note that no legislation before the General Assembly would cut the pension benefits of current retirees. There is widespread acceptance that the court has flatly rejected any reductions in the pensions of those who have already retired. And it's important to remember that, despite strong opposition from the unions of We Are One Illinois, the General Assembly acted in 2010 to significantly reduce the pension benefits of all those hired after January 1, 2011 (Tier 2 pension participants). The courts have consistently ruled that only the benefits of current employees and retirees are constitutionally protected. Benefit reductions-or even elimination-are legal for any employee not yet hired at the time changes to the pension code are made.
 
Rauner and some in the General Assembly are focused on finding ways to get around the constitutional prohibition against cutting the benefits of all employees hired before 1/1/2011 (Tier 1 participants). Relying on the principle of "consideration", they argue that if employees are given something in return for the reduction in benefits, then the cuts would be constitutional. Senate Bill 16, House Bill 4027 and House Bill 4045 are all based on this "consideration" model, as are several other bills that have been introduced.
 
SB 16, HB 4027 and HB 4045 affect all Tier 1 active employees in the SERS, SURS, TRS and Chicago Teachers pension systems. Each requires employees to make an irrevocable choice between:

  1. Accepting a delay and reduction in his/her cost-of-living annual adjustment when he/she retires; or
  2. Agreeing that his/her pension benefit would be calculated using only his/her current salary, excluding all future pay increases from calculation of his/her benefit.

These bills attempt to compensate employees who choose Option 1 above by providing for a "consideration payment" of 10% of an employee's past pension contributions and lowering the employee's  future contribution rate by 10%. 

However, the amount that the employee receives through this payment would be far short of the amount he/she would lose.
 
Union attorneys argue that this scheme does not meet the "consideration" standard but rather is an involuntary and forced diminishment because either choice represents a reduction of benefits. No matter which choice an employee makes, he/she would lose tens of thousands, or even hundreds of thousands, of dollars over the course of his/her retirement years.
 
Moreover, both bills threaten further harm to retirement security because they initiate a process of moving new employees out of all the state's pension systems and placing them in a defined-contribution plan. This will have the effect of reducing contributions into the systems, thus exacerbating the underfunding that has consistently plagued all the systems.
 
On May 17, the Senate passed SB 16 with bipartisan support and little debate. Click here to read a summary of the bill  and here to see how senators voted .

Now the battle shifts to the House of Representatives. HB 4027 and HB 4045 (which have the same core provisions as SB 16) passed the House Pension Committee earlier this week, but a number of those who voted to allow them to move out of committee made clear they intend to vote against them on the floor.

At this time, we don't know whether the House will vote on SB 16, HB 4027 or HB 4045. But one of these bills is very likely to come to the House floor in the next few days.

It's critical that you call your state representative TODAY to urge a NO vote on SB 16, HB 4027, HB 4045 or any other bill that cuts the pensions of public employees. Dial 888-412-6570. Make clear that these bills are unconstitutional, unfair, and you expect your representative to OPPOSE them.